#TBT Book Memories: Galax-Arena

Galax-Arena Book Cover Galax-Arena

Life on other planets
Simon Pulse
1997
Paperback
199

Kidnapped from an Australian train station, Joella, Peter, and Liane are taken on a rocket to the Galax-Arena, where children stolen from Earth perform death-defying stunts for the amusement of the inhabitants of the planet Vexak.

Every Thursday my Facebook feed is filled with grainy old photos from way, way, back. Some show smiling toddler version of my friends. Some show the high school faces I remember fondly. It’s always nice to reminisce about our pasts on social media. Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter help us keep up with our friend’s presents, but on Thursdays, they also offer us a walk down memory lane. For book geeks, our trips to the Shire, to Hogwarts, and beyond through little black letter printed on paper and sandwiched between cardboard are as much a part of our past as vacations to Disneyland and birthday parties in the park. So, every Thursday on All Night Reading I want to share a book that had an impact on me, or a memory surrounding literature and reading.

Today I have chosen Galax-Arena by Gillian Rubinstein. Galax-Arena was the first book I can remember reading that had cursing in it. I know that is a strange thing to remember about a book, but as a goody-two-shoes in middle school, I was slightly scandalized. I wondered if the librarian knew such a book was on the shelf for tender 11-year-olds like myself to pick up. I vowed I would not tell and continued reading.

What I read was an interesting glimpse into science fiction and a dystopian world where young children were kidnapped and forced to perform acrobatics for a mysterious group of aliens. They were treated like circus pets, forced to perform, and sometimes given affection, but never treated as fully thinking and individual human beings. A twist at the end showed me that not everything in the world was as it seemed. It left me wanting more (and I just found out there was a sequel!) When I look back, Galax-Arena was likely the book that spurned a lifelong love affair with dystopian science fiction, anime and manga, and more.

I read it so long ago that the small details are a bit fuzzy, so I plan on picking it up again after I get through the ARCs on my shelf. I wonder how much more I will understand now that I am a bit older, and now that I know the secret at the end? Has anyone else read Galax-Arena? What did you think?

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